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Inside Cotswold Airport: Where 8 British Airways 747s Are Currently Stored

Written by on March 14, 2021

Inside Cotswold Airport: Where 8 British Airways 747s Are Currently Stored                            Article by: Sumit Singh 

In recent years, Cotswold Airport has been a helpful hub facilitating flight operations related to microlights, general aviation, business jets, and commercial airliners. Storage and maintenance firm GCAM can also be found here, providing a high level of service on aircraft. 

Additionally, the airport also conducts plenty of non-aviation activity, including car testing, corporate launches, feature filming, photoshoots, and public country show events. 

 In recent years, Cotswold Airport has been a helpful hub facilitating flight operations related to microlights, general aviation, business jets, and commercial airliners. Storage and maintenance firm GCAM can also be found here, providing a high level of service on aircraft. that disrupted traffic on the way to Bristol last week departed Cotswold. In recent years, Cotswold Airport has been a helpful hub facilitating flight operations related to microlights, general aviation, business jets, and commercial airliners. Storage and maintenance firm GCAM can also be found here, providing a high level of service on aircraft. 

There is plenty on offer here. Nonetheless, the activity that stands out the most is the plane storage and breaking program. 

 Photo: Courtesy Cotswold Airport 

Previously going by the name of Kemble Airfield, the former Royal Air Force station has strong ties to the local community. The British military was deployed here from 1938 until 1993, and prominent fighter aircraft such as the Red Arrows could be seen making their way out of the field. 

It wasn’t only forces from the United Kingdom that would operate at Kemble. The United States Air Force was posted here during the Cold War for maintenance on their A-10 Thunderbolt planes. Northrop F-5s, Lockheed C-130 Hercules, Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers, and McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagles would also be spotted after the Americans moved in. 

After the Cold War, the US Air Force left and handed the field back to the Ministry of Defense. Eventually, it was sold to Ronan Harvey, a local businessman, in March 2001. This move caused the site to go through a significant shift as Commercial and civilian activity started to ramp up. 

Photo: Courtesy Cotswold Airport 

To keep up to date with the operations at the airport or see some more activity behind the scenes, follow Suzannah Harvey and Cotswold Airport on Instagram. 


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